THE NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AGENDA

The national development agenda is guided by the country’s development blueprints – the Kenya Vision 2030, the Constitution of Kenya 2010; the 2nd Medium Term Plan (MTP II) 2013-2017 whose theme is “Transforming Kenya: pathway to devolution, socio-economic development, equity and national unity”, Medium Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF) process 2013-2017 and other government development blue prints and policy documents that are aimed at steering growth and development in the country.

THE CONSTITUTION OF KENYA, 2010

The Constitution of Kenya, 2010 is a progressive document which created a platform for the development agenda in Kenya particularly through legal and governance reforms. One of the key features of the Constitution was the provision in Article 133 for the exercise of Power of Mercy by the President. The Constitution further established a devolved system of government at the County level by creating 47 Counties headed by an elected Governor and County Assembly.

KENYA’S DEVELOPMENT AGENDA

As has been mentioned above, Kenya’s development agenda is driven by amongst others the Vision 2030. This Vision is the country’s long term development blue-print which marks the development path up to the year 2030. Its main objective is to help transform Kenya into a “newly industrializing middle income country by the year 2030”.

Vision 2030 is being implemented in successive five-year Medium-Term Plans (MTP’s) with a corresponding financing process referred to as the Medium Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF), with the first MTP covering the years 2008-2012. The 2nd Medium Term Plan (MTP II) covering the period 2013-2017 bears the theme ‘Transforming Kenya: pathway to devolution, socio-economic development, equity and national unity’. Under this Vision, Kenya expects to meet its Millennium Development Goals (MDG’s) by 2015.

Vision 2030 is guided by three main pillars – the Economic, Social and Political pillars. In addition, there exist enablers and macro projects that form the foundation of Vision 2030.

THE ROLE OF THE COMMITTEE IN KENYA’S NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AGENDA

The Social pillar’s objective in Vision 2030 is to invest in the people and improve the quality of life for all Kenyans by targeting a cross-section of human and social welfare projects and programs.

Through the Committee’s recommendations and release of well reformed and rehabilitated convicts by the President under the Power of Mercy, the Committee subsequently contributes to the National Development Agenda as envisaged in the social pillar of Vision 2030. This happens when the pardoned convicts re-integrate into society and make valuable contributions in national building.

THE ROLE OF THE COMMITTEE IN THE MTP II 2013 – 2017

The Committee, like other government agencies has aligned its programs with the MTP II 2013 – 17 by ensuring that activities planned and executed support the realization of the objectives of the National Development Agenda.

THE COMMITTEE’S COUNTY SPECIFIC INTERVENTIONS

The Committee endeavors to sensitize county leadership and the society on the significance of offering released convicted criminal offenders a second chance to participate in national and county development activities and remove the stigma associated with released convicts. This can be done through recruiting skilled released convicts, offering them employment, contracts and projects to facilitate their smooth re-settlement and re-integration into society.

In addition, the Committee has established supervisory linkages with county leadership and local government security agencies for monitoring and follow up of released convicts in liaison with the home communities.

It is in this regard, that the Committee has developed nationwide county sensitization and public education programs to create awareness and educate the public on the exercise of the Power of Mercy by His Excellency the President. This collaboration with the county governments and society further strengthens the wider national security agenda through effective monitoring and engagement of the released convicts to check against recidivism.

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